Call for a Drug War Truce
With Peace Negotiations

No civilized nation makes war on its own citizens
We, the People, did not declare war on our government, nor do we wish to fight its Drug War. Hence, we now petition for redress of grievances, as follows:

Whereas any just government derives its authority from a respect of the People's rights and powers; and

Whereas the government has resorted to unilateral military force in the Drug War without making any good faith effort to negotiate a peace settlement;

Therefore, We hereby call for a Drug War Truce during which to engage our communities and governments in peace negotiations, under the following terms:

Background on
The Drug War Truce:

The Call for a Drug War Truce was initiated by the Family Council on Drug Awareness in June, 1995 as a petition for redress of grievances. It was first read at the program "Give Drug Peace A Chance", commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations, which in its charter recognizes that governments of the world must both respect and protect the fundamental human rights of all people.

The Drug Peace Campaign has pledged its support in gathering signatures and implementing a negotiated end to the Drug War.

Article 1: The United States shall withdraw from, repudiate, or amend any and all international Treaties or agreements limiting its ability to alter domestic drug policy.

Article 2: No patient shall be prosecuted nor any health care professional penalized for possession or use of any mutually agreed upon medications.

Article 3: Drug policy shall henceforth protect all fundamental rights, as described below:

1. Each person retains all their inalienable, Constitutional, and Human Rights, without exception. No drug regulation shall violate these Rights.

2. The benefit of the doubt shall always be given to the accused and to any property or assets at risk. Courts shall allow the accused to present directly to the jury any defense based on these Rights, any explanation of motive, or any mitigating circumstances, such as religion, culture, or necessity.

3. No victim: no crime. The burden of proof and corroboration in all proceedings shall lie with the government. No secret witness nor paid testimony shall be permitted in court, including that of any government agent or informant who stands to materially gain through the disposition of a drug case or forfeited property. No civil asset forfeiture shall be levied against a family home or legitimate means of commercial livelihood.

4. Issues of entrapment, government motive, and official misconduct shall all be heard by the jury in any drug case, civil or criminal. Government agents who violate the law are fully accountable and shall be prosecuted accordingly.

5. Mandatory minimum sentences undermine our system of justice. The jury shall be informed of all penalties attached to any offense before deliberating a verdict. Courts shall have discretion to reduce penalties in the interest of justice.

Article 4: We propose a Drug War Truce and call for the immediate release of all non-violent and, aside from drug charges involving adults only, law-abiding citizens.

Article 5: No non-violent drug charges involving adults only shall be enforced or prosecuted until all parties have agreed to, and implemented, a drug policy based on full respect for fundamental Rights and personal responsibility.

Epilogue: We proclaim, "Give Drug Peace a Chance."

Structure of the
The Drug War Truce:

The Call for a Drug War Truce was drafted by Chris Conrad with the input of many people. It's specific terms are based on the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR).

The General Assembly of the United Nations proclaimed the UDHR on December l0, l948 as a global response to the Nazi Holocaust. This document enumerates certain rights for all people, encompassing a broad spectrum of economic, social, cultural, political and civil rights.

Its Preamble states that "The General Assembly proclaims this Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance."

While the UDHR is not directly enforceable, many of its principles are included into legally binding treaties, such as: International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment, and Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.

Join Us!

Sign the Call for a Drug War Truce


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endorse the Drug War Truce with peace negotiations:



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Family Council on Drug Awareness

FCDA, PO Box 1716, El Cerrito, CA 94530. USA

Human Rights and the Drug War


A stated goal of international human rights law is to achieve mutual tolerance. American drug policy is designated as "zero tolerance." This is an ominous sign. Begun as a moralistic crusade against a segment of the population who fall on the 'wrong side' of a somewhat arbitrary delineation between illegal and legal drugs, the Drug War has evolved into a huge, profit-driven industry that thrives on the doctrine of zero tolerance.

UN Universal Declaration
of Human Rights

Preamble: Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of the freedom, justice and peace in the world. … Now, therefore The General Assembly proclaims this Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Article 29.2: In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.